Useful Wines: How to Order Wine that you Actually Want

When picking a wine, there is an enormity of options.  It can be frustrating to feel like you are taking repeated, blind stabs at what you hope will be an enjoyable bottle.  To make matters worse, the descriptions on labels or menus -- often written by wine marketers -- are jam-packed with jargon.  Words such as “seductive,” “perfumed,” or “sophisticated” are relatively meaningless when trying to find a similar wine.  One of the reasons I became interested in wine was to be able to identify wines that I enjoyed so that I could have them, and others like them, on a more consistent basis.  So, of all of the wine-related vocabulary, what words are actually useful in finding wines that agree with your palate?

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Expanding the Catalogue: What to do When You're Stuck in a Wine Rut

Wine and music have a lot in common.  They are both experiential and difficult to describe. Personal preferences vary widely.  There is no way to find either wine or music that you really enjoy other than to sit with it, revisit it, think about it, and ultimately decide whether it will become part of your personal catalogue.  But this takes time.  It is no coincidence that so many people discovered much of their favorite music during the early years of college, with the sudden arrival of free time, exposure to new friends, and consequently, new music.  The exploration of new music then slows and ultimately ossifies, until you find yourself typing John Mayer into Pandora -- no judgment!  

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Why You Shouldn't Stress About Wine Pairing

The “new world,” with its blend of cultures and cuisines, is more comfortable with experimentation and fusion.  Indeed, restaurants borrowing ideas from all over the world are a staple in every American city.  However, when it comes to wine, the search for a correct pairing continues unabated.  The pervasive idea that there is a right and a wrong answer to pairing is seated in insecurity about wine --  a series of rigid and complex rules is easier to follow than having the confidence to trust in your own taste.

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